Bergen’s Mission and Forgiveness in the Face of Terror

Bergen’s Mission Image: bergensmission.com
Bergen’s Mission
Image: bergensmission.com

 

Darcy Bergen is responsible for educational financial workshops in his capacity as the president of Bergen Financial Group. Moreover, Darcy Bergen serves as the treasurer of Bergen’s Mission, a charitable organization that supports the missionary work of John and Eloise Bergen. In addition to making direct donations to the organization, individuals can purchase the book, Forgiveness in the Face of Terror, which chronicles John’s and Eloise’s near-fatal experience in Kenya.

John and Eloise traveled to Kenya in 2008 to do missionary work with orphans. During their stay, a group of men broke into their home and assaulted and robbed them. They had great difficulty finding medical assistance and almost lost their lives. The two endured great misfortune. However, they experienced immense healing as they forgave their attackers.

Forgiveness in the Face of Terror explores the unique spiritual journey that John and Eloise took on the path to forgiveness. It includes the suffering and shock they experienced in the aftermath of the attack and the hope and joy they subsequently gained. The couple is committed to continuing to serve people in need in Kenya.

Bergen’s Mission Turns Tragedy into Charity

Bergen’s Mission pic
Bergen’s Mission
Image: bergensmission.com

An accomplished entrepreneur and financial executive based in Phoenix, Arizona, Darcy Bergen serves as president of Bergen Financial Group and as an independent consultant for Bell & Associates. Active in several nonprofit organizations, Darcy Bergen is treasurer of Bergen’s Mission, a charitable foundation that supports children who have been orphaned and other Kenyan youth in need.

Founded by Canadian missionaries John and Eloise Bergen, the foundation raises funds to provide essential resources for orphanages in Kenya, as well as to support general development in the region. The founders established the foundation after a brutal home invasion by nine armed men left them severely injured. The couple, who had been working for the Canadian group Hope for the Nations, remained committed to serving as missionaries and improving the quality of life for Kenyans.

To share their own story of recovery and healing, the couple wrote Forgiveness in the Face of Terror, which is available on www.bergensmission.com or at www.amazon.com.

The Bergen’s Mission Charity

Bergen’s Mission pic
Bergen’s Mission
Image: bergensmission.com

Darcy Bergen is the president of Bergen Financial Group in Mesa, Arizona. In this capacity, Darcy Bergen provides financial advice to seniors and hosts finance workshops throughout Arizona. Outside of work, he also serves as the treasurer of the Bergen’s Mission Charity.

The Bergen’s Mission Charity is an organization that was established following a 2008 attack on John and Eloise Bergen. The couple endured a near-fatal assault and robbery at the hands of eight men in rural Kenya. At the time of the attack, John and Eloise were four months into a mission to help orphaned children. The couple made headlines for choosing to remain in Kenya after their long recovery, despite the horrors that they experienced. They also publicly forgave their attackers during the course of their recovery. The local police managed to find and arrest all of the men involved.

The Bergens are now back home in Canada. They wrote a book about their mission in Kenya, and they often speak about the 2008 attack and their subsequent recovery at special functions.

To learn more about the Bergen’s Mission Charity, visit www.bergensmission.com.

A Look at Bergen’s Mission

Bergen’s Mission pic
Bergen’s Mission
Image: bergensmission.com

Darcy Bergen supports Bergen’s Mission, the work of his parents, John and Eloise Bergen, and was inspired by a traumatic ordeal they went through in Kenya. Darcy Bergen and others have drawn inspiration from the Christ-centered message of John and Eloise and from their personal story of suffering and forgiveness.

In 2008, Canadians John and Eloise Bergen were in Kenya working as Christian missionaries among orphans for the group Hope for the Nations. Eloise Bergen was taking a bath at the couple’s home when five intruders entered the bathroom armed with machetes and clubs and assaulted her. Her husband, who was outside the house, was also assaulted by the men.

The attackers left the couple badly injured but still alive, and John and Eloise were forced to leave their house and venture outside seeking help. They were eventually airlifted to Nairobi, where they were initially both in critical condition. They received medical attention for the various injuries they sustained, including multiple fractures and contusions. Their assailants were later arrested, and police learned that the assaults were part of a larger conspiracy that involved the men hired to handle security for the Bergens.

Despite the ordeal, the Bergens both said soon after the attacks that they forgave their attackers. They have continued to do missionary work and tell their story at church meetings and other functions.

Kenya’s Orphaned Children

Due in large part to the AIDS crisis, more than a million children in Kenya live without one or both of their parents. The number of Kenyan orphans reflects a disproportionately high death rate from AIDS among Africans. In fact, 46% of Kenyan orphaned children lost their parents to AIDS and its debilitating complications. Moreover, a number of Kenyan children are regarded as orphans not because their parents have died, but because they are wholly unable to care for them.

More than half of the orphaned children in Kenya are between the ages of 10 and 14 According to statistics, approximately 35% of Kenyan orphans are between ages fives and nine, with the remainder under five years old.

“The plight of Kenyan orphans saddens us immensely,” said Darcy Bergen, President of Bergen’s Mission, an organization that provides care and funding for those children in Kenya who lack parents to care for them. “We are gratified that we have the opportunity to positively impact so many young lives.”

For many of these orphaned children, neglect remains one of the most prevalent effects of the deaths of their parents. Even before their parents’ death, the children often suffer from physical and emotional neglect as their parents are too weak to provide for them. This can have a profound impact on the children for the rest of their lives. In addition, because they have lost the traditional family structure that is so important in Kenyan society, orphaned children may become disconnected from the rest of their community. The emotional trauma experienced by these children before the death of their parents and during the immediate bereavement period stays with them for years to come, and some experts worry that these issues could affect any children they might have. Another wrenching experience for Kenya’s orphans is their uprooting after the deaths of their parents. While there are an increasing number of organizations that provide care and hope for these children, some fall into less than ideal situations. As such, it continues to be vitally important that we support missions that care for orphaned children in Kenya.